Is Genetic Engineering Cloning Part Of Our Future?

Genetic engineering cloning is only one small aspect of a science which is still in its infancy, but which has the potential to change everything about the way the world is, the way people live, the way food is grown, and the way illnesses are treated. It is, however, one of the most significant and potentially far reaching applications of the technology as it deals directly with the creation of a human being to order, from the existing genes of another. If genetic engineering as a whole is controversial, this potential application of it is likely to create more extreme reactions than any other.

Cloning an existing body is not a true application of genetic engineering in the sense that genes are not actually manipulated to create something new, but simply duplicated to create a copy of something which already exists. This can be achieved by duplicating the genes of a being which already exists, either alive or recently dead. These genes can then be implanted into a human egg, so that they can incubate and grow in the usual way. The result of this will be a body identical to the one from which the genetic material was taken.

Which brings us to the obvious question of why anyone would want to do this in the first place? The answer is largely to do with potential medical practices which may be possible in future years. As everyone knows, there are some medical patients who cannot be saved without the donation of an organ into the ailing body. This organ will usually come from a donor, someone who has recently died and expressed a wish for their body parts to be used after their death. There will be a significant chance that the organ will be accepted by the body if it is a good match, but there are no guarantees.

types of genetic engineering

As a kind of precursor to genetic engineering cloning there have been experiments using animal organs to take the place of human ones. These animal organs are highly likely to be rejected by the human body, no matter what the original source. It is for this reason that experiments are being carried out into the possibility of creating animals with a genetic blueprint similar to that of humans, so that the likelihood of a human body accepting the organ can be greatly increased. The ethics of such experiments are, of course, hotly debated.

Genuine cloning would, of course, provide a more stable alternative to any of these procedures. The organ grown in the cloned body will be a perfect match for the original organ as it will have the identical genetic profile. The only difficulty will be carrying out the actual transplant, as these will always involve risk. The possibilities exist for this type of genetic clone to be produced from every living human, so that replacement organs are available for everyone. Of course, this is all a long way off, but proponents of the technology are quick to point out the possibilities.

genetic engineering

It remains to be seen, of course, whether or not genetic engineering cloning plays any significant role in future medical developments. The availability of the technology is not in doubt, and neither is its potential effectiveness. What is in doubt is whether many of these applications are financially viable, and, of course, we still know so little about human DNA so the results would be unpredictable. There are also the ethical issues, which will doubtless be discussed at length in government meetings for many years to come. Only time will decide the future of genetic engineering cloning.

 

 

 

Genetic Engineering News:

 

Long-lasting flu vaccine could replace yearly shots - Science News for Students

Science News for Students

Long-lasting flu vaccine could replace yearly shots
Science News for Students
(in genetics) A quality or characteristic that can be inherited. vaccine (v. vaccinate) A biological mixture that resembles a disease-causing agent. It is given to help the body create immunity to a particular disease. The injections used to administer .

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Gene therapy offers long-term treatment for mice with diabetes - Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

Gene therapy offers long-term treatment for mice with diabetes
Los Angeles Times
But advances in genetic engineering have made it possible to disarm viruses of their ability to sicken people without compromising their knack for sneaking into cells and altering their DNA. With hundreds of experimental gene therapies now under .

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Link between statistics, research and decision making - Rising Kashmir

Link between statistics, research and decision making
Rising Kashmir
Application of social research:There is large number of applications of social research such as in thefield of population, education, health, medicine, genetic engineering etc. Also the National SampleSurvey Office(NSSO) under the Ministry of .

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Virus stampingEUR”a versatile new method for genetic engineering of single cells - Phys.Org

Phys.Org

Virus stampingEUR”a versatile new method for genetic engineering of single cells
Phys.Org
For decades now, scientists have used viruses as vehicles for introducing new genes into cells. Different types of viruses such as lentivirus, herpes simplex and adeno-associated viruses can be used to genetically engineer individual cells or cellular .

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Scientists engineer sound-reflecting bacteria - Cosmos

Cosmos

Scientists engineer sound-reflecting bacteria
Cosmos
Scientists at the California Institute of Technology in the US have genetically engineered bacteria capable of sending sonar signals from deep within the human body. The modified Escherichia coli contain genes from two other species of bacteria .

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KAIST team develops technology to find optimum drug target for cancer - EurekAlert (press release)

EurekAlert (press release)

KAIST team develops technology to find optimum drug target for cancer
EurekAlert (press release)
A KAIST research team led by Professor Kwang-Hyun Cho of the Department of Bio and Brain Engineering developed technology to find the optimum drug target according to the type of cancer cell. The team used systems biology to analyze molecular network .

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