What Is The Future Of Genetic Engineering In Animals?

Genetic engineering in animals is the second stage of the intended advance of this technology, after the stage where plants are genetically modified to try to improve crop yields. There can several reasons why scientists would want to change the genetic profile of animals, from the simple consideration of improving milk yields in cattle to actually attempting to create animals whose organs can be transplanted into humans. There are huge moral arguments raging concerning all of these issues, as well as doubts as to the feasibility of actually putting many of the theories into practice.

The most obvious application of animal genetic engineering is in improving the food yields of farm animals. This can be extended to include other consumable products derived from farms, such as the wool from sheep. As of now, there are no commercial applications of this technology yet in use, as the expense of applying them would outweigh the savings to be made from the extra yields. Nevertheless, it is possible at least in theory to grow larger animals for meat, to extract more milk from cows, and to breed hens which will lay more eggs. These technologies may well be developed as side benefits of other animal genetic experiments.

Far less publicized is the possibility of using specially bred animals to test drugs for use in human beings. The idea is to breed farm animals which are as similar as possible to humans in the way they react to pharmaceutical products, and then to use these animals to try to test drugs before they are given to humans. If this could be done successfully, it would greatly lessen the expense involved in developing drugs which could be of great benefit to the sufferers of many illnesses. There are, of course, many difficult ethical considerations to overcome with this practice.

types of genetic engineering

Even more controversial is the use of genetic engineering in animals to create organs which can be transplanted into human beings. An example of this is the heart of a pig, which in theory could replace a malfunctioning human heart and carry out the same job, if only the human body did not reject it. An ordinary pig heart would always be rejected by a human recipient, but a heart from a pig which has been genetically modified may well not be. This technique will not be limited to heart transplants, it could be used for any organ which will function as the original organ functioned.

Whether any of these potential technologies ever come to fruition remains to be seen, but there is a high chance that they will. The testing of drugs on animals is something which the cash rich pharmaceutical industry will desperately want to do, as it will increase their profits which allowing them to get the drugs into the hands of more people. Farming technologies are less clear cut, as there are other drug based methods of improving yields which are far cheaper to implement. Only the future will tell which of the viable technologies are also financially viable.

genetic engineering

The moral and philosophical considerations with genetic engineering in animals are obviously extreme, and people on both sides of the fence are vehement in arguing their cause, and entirely convinced that they are right. It is also impossible to predict with accuracy what will happen with the laws concerning these experiments, but so far governments throughout the Western world have licensed genetically modified food, and some don't even require it to be labeled. History suggests that financial interests are likely to come out on top whenever there is a debate, and this will probably happen with genetic engineering in animals.

 

 

 

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Scientists are still determining the various ways CRISPR molecules interact with various types of DNA. A key question: how accurate are CRISPR molecules? Do they sometimes confuse . gene editing may one day protect babies from a variety of hereditary .

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Genetically Engineered Corals Could Help Save the Coral Reefs - Interesting Engineering

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Genetically Engineered Corals Could Help Save the Coral Reefs
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One of the reasons it's so resilient to changes that kill other corals is because it has more genetic variation than most other types of algae. . The usual, well-established genetic engineering methods wouldn't work on this particular species .

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Seeds in space EUR how well can they survive harsh, non-Earth conditions? - San Francisco Chronicle

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Seeds in space EUR how well can they survive harsh, non-Earth conditions?
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A second ISS mission called EXPOSE-R included only the three types of Arabidopsis seeds. These received a little over double the dose of . The 11 Arabidopsis plants that did grow from both the wild type and genetically engineered seeds did not .
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Quest to colonize space demands boost from biotechnology, synthetic biology - Genetic Literacy Project

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Quest to colonize space demands boost from biotechnology, synthetic biology
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Examples of how genetic engineering can help in this area include onsite synthesis of drugs, a capability that will be vital to colonizations, since drugs are vulnerable to radiation, making the prospect of transporting medicines from Earth unattractive.

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FDA Approves First 'Biosimilar' for Cancer Treatment - TheStreet.com

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FDA Approves First 'Biosimilar' for Cancer Treatment
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AbbVie's (ABBV) Humira, a treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, Crohn's disease and other conditions, is the globe's top selling drug, according to Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, with annual sales of $16 billion. Other biologics .

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10 mega myths about farming to remember on your next grocery run - Chicago Daily Herald

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10 mega myths about farming to remember on your next grocery run
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Most of us don't spend our days plowing fields or wrangling cattle. We're part of the 99 percent of Americans who eat food, but don't produce it. Although we can be concerned about how our food is produced, our assumptions when we are grocery shopping .

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